Maybe NASCAR is talking to the wrong people

Backstretch grandstands like these at Talladega in 2011, are no longer being used at many tracks and in some cases being removed altogether . (Getty Images)
Backstretch grandstands like these at Talladega in 2011, are no longer being used at many tracks and in some cases being removed altogether . (Getty Images)
Backstretch grandstands like these at Talladega in 2011, are no longer being used at many tracks and in some cases being removed altogether . (Getty Images)

In the past few months the talk in NASCAR has been about what to do to make the sport better.  Shorter races, new aero packages to create better racing on the track and changing up the order of the races, are just some of the subjects being bantered about. Drivers have even formed a council to open a dialogue with NASCAR.  All this talk comes amid the facts that there are fewer fans in the seats and fewer eyes on the TV broadcasts . Although to be fair ratings for opening part of the season are up slightly for Fox, the TV ratings have been falling for the past few years. All this has led tracks to removing seats, and NASCAR to hire a bunch of very smart, and very good, people who now work for NASCAR Integrated Marketing Communications.

NASCAR has talked to its drivers, its stakeholders (sponsors) and others around the sport trying to find a magic formula that will lift the sport back towards where it once was.

The problem however may be that NASCAR has been talking to the wrong people. MORE>>>

About Greg Engle 7420 Articles
Greg is a published award winning sportswriter who spent 23 years combined active and active reserve military service, much of that in and around the Special Operations community. Greg is the author of "The Nuts and Bolts of NASCAR: The Definitive Viewers' Guide to Big-Time Stock Car Auto Racing" and has been published in major publications across the country including the Los Angeles Times, the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He was also a contributor to Chicken Soup for the NASCAR Soul, published in 2010, and the Christmas edition in 2016. He wrote as the NASCAR, Formula 1, Auto Reviews and National Veterans Affairs Examiner for Examiner.com and has appeared on Fox News. He holds a BS degree in communications, a Masters degree in psychology and is currently a PhD candidate majoring in psychology. He is currently the weekend Motorsports Editor for Autoweek.