Drivers give positive feedback on new restart rule

LOUDON, NH - SEPTEMBER 20: Carl Edwards, driver of the #99 Aflac Ford, sits in his car in the garage area during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 20, 2013 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
LOUDON, NH - SEPTEMBER 20:  Carl Edwards, driver of the #99 Aflac Ford, sits in his car in the garage area during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 20, 2013 in Loudon, New Hampshire.  (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)
LOUDON, NH – SEPTEMBER 20: Carl Edwards, driver of the #99 Aflac Ford, sits in his car in the garage area during practice for the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Sylvania 300 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway on September 20, 2013 in Loudon, New Hampshire. (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)

LOUDON, N.H.—The consensus among Cup drivers is that the tweak to the restart rules introduced for the first Chase race last Sunday at Chicagoland has made a potentially gnarly situation less complicated.

After the leader of the race, who controls the restart, picks up the pace in the restart zone, the flagman waves the green, and drivers begin racing without changing lanes until they reach the start/finish line. No longer does the lead car have to reach the stripe first—a requirement before the change made last Sunday.

Accordingly, NASCAR no longer has to make a judgment call as to whether the lead driver spins his tires, misses a shift or has another issues that would excuse the second-place car from getting to the line first. The rule change also makes it less likely for the second-place car to stack up its line trying to stay behind the leader.

“I think NASCAR did a good job by simplifying the restart rules,” Carl Edwards said. “I think it makes it easier, because the leader gets to start, and after that it’s a race. That’s probably the simplest way to do it with the double-file restart.”

The restart rule won’t concern Edwards on Sunday—at least not early in the Sylvania 300. The driver of the No. 99 Fordo qualified 26th, deepest in the field among Chase competitors.

“For me, I’ll have to get to the front row to worry about it,” Edwards said wryly. “We’ve got a long ways to go here.”

About Greg Engle 7420 Articles
Greg is a published award winning sportswriter who spent 23 years combined active and active reserve military service, much of that in and around the Special Operations community. Greg is the author of "The Nuts and Bolts of NASCAR: The Definitive Viewers' Guide to Big-Time Stock Car Auto Racing" and has been published in major publications across the country including the Los Angeles Times, the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He was also a contributor to Chicken Soup for the NASCAR Soul, published in 2010, and the Christmas edition in 2016. He wrote as the NASCAR, Formula 1, Auto Reviews and National Veterans Affairs Examiner for Examiner.com and has appeared on Fox News. He holds a BS degree in communications, a Masters degree in psychology and is currently a PhD candidate majoring in psychology. He is currently the weekend Motorsports Editor for Autoweek.