Did NASCAR blow the call at the Glen?

Brad Keselowski, driver of the #2 Miller Lite Dodge, and Marcos Ambrose, driver of the #9 Stanley Ford, battle for position during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Finger Lakes 355 at the Glen at Watkins Glen International on August 12, 2012 in Watkins Glen, New York. (Photo by John Harrelson/Getty Images for NASCAR)
Brad Keselowski, driver of the #2 Miller Lite Dodge, and Marcos Ambrose, driver of the #9 Stanley Ford, battle for position during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Finger Lakes 355 at the Glen at Watkins Glen International on August 12, 2012 in Watkins Glen, New York. (Photo by John Harrelson/Getty Images for NASCAR)

It was one of the wildest finishes of the 2012 NASCAR Sprint Cup season. Sunday’s finish at Watkins Glen also marked the first time a last lap pass determined a winner at the 2.45 mile road course.  According to most of the drivers, the result was due to oil on the track and some added that oil should have caused NASCAR to throw a caution flag.

Kyle Busch was in control of the 90 lap race as the end neared.  After starting second, Busch took the lead on the opening laps and looked to be the car to beat.  He would lead a race high 43 laps with his biggest challenge coming from Brad Keselowski.  With less than six laps to go Busch had a comfortable lead over Keselowski and looked well on his way to victory. But just before he came to the white flag, Busch’s Toyota began to slide back and forth, leading many to believe he was out of fuel, and allowing Keselowski and third place Marcos Ambrose to close.

After taking the white flag, Busch held on to a tenuous lead but entering the esses, Busch spun after contact with Keselowski and Keselowski and Ambrose charged past.  Shortly after both Keselowski and Ambrose got loose and battled in the dirt and on the track; Ambrose would muscle past a sliding Keselowski and go on to his second Sprint Cup victory.

Ambrose said later that oil had caused the havoc on the last lap.MORE>>>

About Greg Engle 7420 Articles
Greg is a published award winning sportswriter who spent 23 years combined active and active reserve military service, much of that in and around the Special Operations community. Greg is the author of "The Nuts and Bolts of NASCAR: The Definitive Viewers' Guide to Big-Time Stock Car Auto Racing" and has been published in major publications across the country including the Los Angeles Times, the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He was also a contributor to Chicken Soup for the NASCAR Soul, published in 2010, and the Christmas edition in 2016. He wrote as the NASCAR, Formula 1, Auto Reviews and National Veterans Affairs Examiner for Examiner.com and has appeared on Fox News. He holds a BS degree in communications, a Masters degree in psychology and is currently a PhD candidate majoring in psychology. He is currently the weekend Motorsports Editor for Autoweek.