Logano battles back to fifth after tough start

FORT WORTH, TX - APRIL 13: Crew members work on the #22 Shell-Pennzoil Ford of Joey Logano in the garage area prior to the start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series NRA 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on April 13, 2013 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images for Texs Motor Speedway)
FORT WORTH, TX - APRIL 13:  Crew members work on the #22 Shell-Pennzoil Ford of Joey Logano in the garage area prior to the start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series NRA 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on April 13, 2013 in Fort Worth, Texas.  (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images for Texs Motor Speedway)
FORT WORTH, TX – APRIL 13: Crew members work on the #22 Shell-Pennzoil Ford of Joey Logano in the garage area prior to the start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series NRA 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on April 13, 2013 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images for Texs Motor Speedway)

FORT WORTH, Tex.–Joey Logano who was listed as eighteenth in the starting line-up, began at the rear of the NRA 500 Saturday night at Texas Motor Speedway after his car did not pass the pre-race inspection. However, he managed to pull out an impressive finish, coming in fifth.

“It was one of the toughest races I think we’ve ever dealt with and to come with a top-five out of something like that, we couldn’t be more excited about that,” said Logano. “I was almost a third-place finish there if the last caution had come out, but these guys worked really hard on this Shell/ Pennzoil Ford on getting us out at least to race.”

NASCAR inspectors didn’t like the rear end housing of Penske car. Parts were confiscated and his car headed back to the garage. His crew worked vigorously, but it took them three attempts before the No. 22 Ford passed NASCAR’S laser-controlled computerized inspection. But inspection wasn’t over, and they encountered yet another setback. The right side of the car was 10 pounds to light, so back to the garage it went.

Logano was not in the car when it was pushed onto pit road at 6:41p.m., after the command to start engines had been given.

“It was too close for my comfort, to be honest with you, and having to start from the back we worked out way up. (Crew chief)Todd Gordon did a great job keeping everyone under control and not getting overwhelmed by everything,” said Logano. “He focused in and made his adjustments and got our car a lot better than what it was.”

Brad Keselowski’s car also did not pass pre-inspection the first time around because of his car’s rear end housing, but he made it on the track on time to take his starting position before the engines were fired.

NASCAR may still issue a penalty later this week.

About Greg Engle 7420 Articles
Greg is a published award winning sportswriter who spent 23 years combined active and active reserve military service, much of that in and around the Special Operations community. Greg is the author of "The Nuts and Bolts of NASCAR: The Definitive Viewers' Guide to Big-Time Stock Car Auto Racing" and has been published in major publications across the country including the Los Angeles Times, the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He was also a contributor to Chicken Soup for the NASCAR Soul, published in 2010, and the Christmas edition in 2016. He wrote as the NASCAR, Formula 1, Auto Reviews and National Veterans Affairs Examiner for Examiner.com and has appeared on Fox News. He holds a BS degree in communications, a Masters degree in psychology and is currently a PhD candidate majoring in psychology. He is currently the weekend Motorsports Editor for Autoweek.