Kurt Busch does NASCAR proud

CHARLOTTE, NC - MAY 25: Kurt Busch, driver of the #41 Haas Automation Made in America Chevrolet, waits for driver introductions prior to the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 25, 2014 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Jerry Markland/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC - MAY 25:  Kurt Busch, driver of the #41 Haas Automation Made in America Chevrolet, waits for driver introductions prior to the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 25, 2014 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Photo by Jerry Markland/Getty Images)
CHARLOTTE, NC – MAY 25: Kurt Busch, driver of the #41 Haas Automation Made in America Chevrolet, waits for driver introductions prior to the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on May 25, 2014 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Jerry Markland/Getty Images)

There are those moments when those who consider themselves part of the NASCAR Nation come together as one. It happens each weekend during the long NASCAR season as we follow our favorite driver and hope they are in victory lane on Sunday afternoon; or when there is some sort of controversy, such as an on-track dust up between drivers or a major rule change from NASCAR. Each chooses a side, one driver or the other, or the new rule is great or dumb. Issues that polarize the masses, divide this, what we call, the NASCAR Nation.

Sunday was different.

As the NASCAR Sprint Cup series prepared to run its longest race of the season, the Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway, everyone’s attention was focused on a historic track hundreds of miles away in the center of Indiana. NASCAR visits the Indianapolis Motor Speedway once a season, but that’s not the biggest race there. The Indy 500 on Memorial Day weekend is, and to most will always be, the biggest motorsports event in America. MORE>>>

About Greg Engle 7420 Articles
Greg is a published award winning sportswriter who spent 23 years combined active and active reserve military service, much of that in and around the Special Operations community. Greg is the author of "The Nuts and Bolts of NASCAR: The Definitive Viewers' Guide to Big-Time Stock Car Auto Racing" and has been published in major publications across the country including the Los Angeles Times, the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He was also a contributor to Chicken Soup for the NASCAR Soul, published in 2010, and the Christmas edition in 2016. He wrote as the NASCAR, Formula 1, Auto Reviews and National Veterans Affairs Examiner for Examiner.com and has appeared on Fox News. He holds a BS degree in communications, a Masters degree in psychology and is currently a PhD candidate majoring in psychology. He is currently the weekend Motorsports Editor for Autoweek.