AJ Allmendinger has no plans to bring attorney to ‘B’ sample test, manager says

AJ Allmendinger was in his first year with Penske Racing when he was suspended. (Getty Images)
AJ Allmendinger is in his first year with Penske Racing. (Getty Images)

LOUDON, N.H. — Tara Ragan, business manager for suspended driver AJ Allmendinger, debunked published reports that Walldinger Racing plans to bring an attorney to the testing of Allmendinger’s “B” sample, the next step in the procedure under NASCAR’s substance abuse program.

As set forth in NASCAR’s rule book, Allmendinger may attend the “B” sample test at Aegis Sciences Corporation in Nashville, Tenn., or send a qualified toxicologist to represent him.

Allmendinger was suspended Saturday before that night’s Coke Zero 400 at Daytona because the “A” sample from a urine test collected June 29 at Kentucky Speedway tested positive for what Ragan termed in a subsequent statement “a stimulant” in an amount that was “slightly above the threshold.”

Ragan’s statement also included the assertion that Allmendinger had never knowingly taken a prohibited substance and indicated he was requesting a test of the “B” sample, which was collected at the same time as the “A” sample.

The Associated Press reported Thursday that “Allmendinger wants his own toxicologist and attorney present,” citing sources familiar with the case. Noting that the language in the NASCAR rule book restricts attendance at the “B” sample test to the member (Allmendinger, in this case) or a qualified toxicologist, Ragan said Friday morning that Walldinger Racing intended to follow the rules as stated.

Ragan said she took the passage in Section 19-11 B (2) of the rule book literally: “The NASCAR member may be present (either personally or represented by a qualified toxicologist not associated with Aegis) during the second test at his/her expense . . .”

Ragan said Allmendinger has not been informed of a “B” sample test date, next week or otherwise.

About Greg Engle 7420 Articles
Greg is a published award winning sportswriter who spent 23 years combined active and active reserve military service, much of that in and around the Special Operations community. Greg is the author of "The Nuts and Bolts of NASCAR: The Definitive Viewers' Guide to Big-Time Stock Car Auto Racing" and has been published in major publications across the country including the Los Angeles Times, the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He was also a contributor to Chicken Soup for the NASCAR Soul, published in 2010, and the Christmas edition in 2016. He wrote as the NASCAR, Formula 1, Auto Reviews and National Veterans Affairs Examiner for Examiner.com and has appeared on Fox News. He holds a BS degree in communications, a Masters degree in psychology and is currently a PhD candidate majoring in psychology. He is currently the weekend Motorsports Editor for Autoweek.